Phrasal Verbs with “GET,” along with their meanings

What are phrasal verbs and how to use them?

Phrasal verbs are like the cool kids of the English language – they’re a combo of a verb and one or more prepositions or adverbs.

Think of them as those dynamic duos that spice up your conversations.

Using phrasal verbs can make your language more vivid and informal.

Instead of saying “look for,” you can jazz it up with “search for.” Or, swap out “give up” for the more laid-back “quit.”

Here’s the thing: sometimes the meaning of a phrasal verb isn’t obvious by just looking at the individual words. You kinda need to get the vibe of it through usage.

Like, take “hang out.” It doesn’t mean hanging clothes; it means chilling with friends.

So, to really get the hang of phrasal verbs, you gotta pay attention to how people use them in context.

Also, don’t be afraid to experiment with phrasal verbs in your own speech.

Just go with the flow, and soon you’ll be tossing them around like a language ninja.

So, kick back, have fun, and let those phrasal verbs add some flair to your English game!

Now, I’ve got tons of phrasal verbs with “GET”.

Let’s dive into it.

Try using them into your daily conversation.

Also Read: How to Build English Vocabulary: 10 Tips for Success

A list of phrasal verbs with “get,”:

Get ahead (of):

Meaning: To make progress or be more successful than others.

Example: She works hard to get ahead in her career.

Get along (with):

Meaning: To have a good relationship or be on friendly terms with someone.

Example: Despite their differences, they manage to get along.

Get away (with):

Meaning: To escape without being caught or punished.

Example: He thought he could get away with cheating on the test.

Get by:

Meaning: To manage or survive with the available resources.

Example: In tough times, we have to find ways to get by.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get,”:

Get down to:

Meaning: To start doing something seriously or with focus.

Example: Let’s get down to work and finish this project.

Get in:

Meaning: To enter or be allowed to enter a place.

Example: We need to get in before the concert starts.

Get off:

Meaning: To leave a vehicle or aircraft; also, to avoid punishment.

Example: We’ll get off the bus at the next stop. He was lucky to get off with just a warning.

Get on (with):

Meaning: To have a good relationship or make progress with something.

Example: I get on well with my colleagues. Let’s get on with the task at hand.

Also read:

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get out:

Meaning: To leave a place.

Example: It’s time to get out of the house and enjoy the sunshine.

Get over:

Meaning: To recover from an illness or emotional difficulty.

Example: It took her a while to get over the flu. I hope you can get over your breakup soon.

Get through (to):

Meaning: To successfully communicate with someone.

Example: I couldn’t get through to him; he wasn’t listening.

Get together:

Meaning: To meet or gather with people.

Example: Let’s get together for dinner this weekend.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get up:

Meaning: To rise from a sitting or lying position; also, to organize or start an event.

Example: I usually get up at 6 am. We should get up a charity event for the community.

Get over with:

Meaning: To finish or complete something, often unpleasant.

Example: Let’s get this meeting over with so we can go home.

Get by (on):

Meaning: To survive or manage with the minimum necessary.

Example: In expensive cities, many people have to get by on low incomes.

These are just a few examples, and there are many more phrasal verbs with “get” that you can explore.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get across:

Meaning: To successfully communicate or convey a message or idea.

Example: It’s challenging to get complex ideas across in a short presentation.

Get at:

Meaning: To imply or suggest; also, to reach or access something.

Example: What are you getting at with that comment? I can’t get at the files on the top shelf.

Get down:

Meaning: To feel sad or depressed; also, to write something down.

Example: The news about the accident really got me down. Get down these important points before you forget.

Get in on:

Meaning: To become involved in or participate in something.

Example: I want to get in on the project; it sounds interesting.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get off on:

Meaning: To derive pleasure or satisfaction from something.

Example: Some people get off on solving challenging puzzles.

Get on by:

Meaning: To manage or cope with a situation.

Example: Despite the challenges, they always find a way to get on by.

Get out of:

Meaning: To avoid doing something.

Example: He tried to get out of doing his homework, but his mom insisted.

Get through with:

Meaning: To finish or complete something, especially a task.

Example: Once we get through with this project, we can take a break.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get to:

Meaning: To start doing or working on something; also, to annoy or irritate.

Example: I need to get to my assignments. His constant complaints really get to me.

Get together with:

Meaning: To meet or spend time with someone.

Example: Let’s get together with our friends for a picnic.

Get on to:

Meaning: To start discussing a topic or move forward with a plan.

Example: We need to get on to the next item on the agenda.

Get rid of:

Meaning: To eliminate or dispose of something.

Example: I need to get rid of these old clothes; they’re taking up too much space.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get behind:

Meaning: To support or endorse something; also, to fall behind in a schedule.

Example: Let’s all get behind this initiative for a cleaner environment. I got behind on my work due to unexpected delays.

Get over with:

Meaning: To finish or complete something quickly.

Example: Can we get this meeting over with? I have other tasks to attend to.

Get on with:

Meaning: To continue or proceed with something.

Example: We need to get on with the project if we want to meet the deadline.

Get along without:

Meaning: To manage or survive without something.

Example: She has learned to get along without a car since she moved to the city.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get back at:

Meaning: To retaliate or take revenge on someone.

Example: Instead of getting back at him, she chose to forgive and move on.

Get by on:

Meaning: To survive or manage with a specific amount or level.

Example: We can get by on a smaller budget if we cut unnecessary expenses.

Get in on the act:

Meaning: To become involved in an activity that has already started.

Example: Everyone wanted to get in on the act once they saw the success of the project.

Get off the ground:

Meaning: To start or make progress.

Example: The new business struggled to get off the ground in its first year.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get on in years:

Meaning: To get older or age.

Example: As they got on in years, they decided to travel and enjoy life more.

Get on the wrong side of:

Meaning: To anger or upset someone.

Example: Be careful not to get on the wrong side of your supervisor; it could affect your career.

Get out of hand:

Meaning: To become uncontrollable or chaotic.

Example: The party started getting out of hand when more people showed up.

Get to the bottom of:

Meaning: To discover the truth or the real cause of a situation.

Example: We need to get to the bottom of these accounting discrepancies.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get your act together:

Meaning: To organize yourself or start behaving in a more controlled and efficient way.

Example: It’s time to get your act together and meet your deadlines.

Get wind of:

Meaning: To hear about or become aware of something.

Example: The manager got wind of the upcoming changes in the company policy.

Get over oneself:

Meaning: To stop being self-centered or egotistical.

Example: It’s time for him to get over himself and consider others’ opinions.

Get around to:

Meaning: To finally find time to do something.

Example: I’ll get around to cleaning the garage this weekend.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get in the way:

Meaning: To obstruct or hinder someone or something.

Example: Don’t let personal issues get in the way of your professional success.

Get out of the way:

Meaning: To move aside to allow something or someone to pass.

Example: Get out of the way! The car is coming. 

Get down to business:

Meaning: To start discussing or working on important matters.

Example: Let’s get down to business and finalize the details of the project.

Get in the way of:

Meaning: To hinder or obstruct someone or something.

Example: Don’t let your fears get in the way of pursuing your dreams.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get the hang of:

Meaning: To learn or understand how to do something.

Example: It took a while, but I finally got the hang of playing the guitar.

Get wind of:

Meaning: To hear about or learn of something, often through informal channels.

Example: She got wind of the gossip circulating around the office.

Get a kick out of:

Meaning: To find amusement or enjoyment in something.

Example: I always get a kick out of watching old comedy movies.

Get the ball rolling:

Meaning: To initiate or start a process or activity.

Example: Let’s get the ball rolling on the new marketing campaign.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get a handle on:

Meaning: To gain control or understanding of a situation.

Example: It took some time, but I finally got a handle on the new software.

Get a move on:

Meaning: To hurry or move quickly.

Example: We need to get a move on if we want to catch the train.

Get the picture:

Meaning: To understand or comprehend a situation.

Example: I explained it to him three times, but I’m not sure he really gets the picture.

Get your hands on:

Meaning: To obtain or acquire something.

Example: I can’t wait to get my hands on the latest book by my favorite author.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get a word in edgewise:

Meaning: To find an opportunity to speak in a conversation dominated by others.

Example: It’s hard to get a word in edgewise when everyone is talking at once.

Get a leg up on:

Meaning: To gain an advantage over someone or something.

Example: Completing the training program will help you get a leg up on the competition.

Get the show on the road:

Meaning: To start an event or activity.

Example: Now that everyone is here, let’s get the show on the road.

Get in on the gro$und floor:

Meaning: To become involved in something at an early stage.

Example: Investors who got in on the ground floor of the company saw substantial returns.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get the better of:

Meaning: To overcome or outsmart someone or something.

Example: Don’t let your emotions get the better of you in a challenging situation. 

Get a taste of:

Meaning: To experience a small amount of something.

Example: Traveling allows you to get a taste of different cultures.

Get the point:

Meaning: To understand the main idea or argument.

Example: After a lengthy explanation, he finally got the point.

Get a grip on:

Meaning: To gain control or understanding of a situation.

Example: It’s essential to get a grip on your finances before making big decisions.

A list of phrasal verbs with “get”:

Get cold feet:

Meaning: To suddenly become nervous or fearful, especially about a significant decision.

Example: As the wedding day approached, she started to get cold feet.

Get on someone’s nerves:

Meaning: To irritate or annoy someone.

Example: Her constant complaining really gets on my nerves.

Get the short end of the stick:

Meaning: To receive less favorable treatment or a less desirable outcome.

Example: In the negotiation, it felt like we got the short end of the stick.

Get a word in:

Meaning: To find an opportunity to speak in a conversation.

Example: The discussion was so intense that I couldn’t get a word in.

Get up to speed:

Meaning: To become fully informed or knowledgeable about something.

Example: I need a few days to get up to speed with the new project.

Get a rise out of someone:

Meaning: To provoke or elicit a reaction from someone.

Example: He always tries to get a rise out of his coworkers with his jokes.

Get the ball in motion:

Meaning: To initiate or start a process or project.

Example: Let’s get the ball in motion and launch the new initiative.

Get wind of:

Meaning: To learn about or discover something, often through rumors or gossip.

Example: I got wind of a new job opportunity at the company.

Get a load of:

Meaning: To look at or examine closely.

Example: Come over here and get a load of this amazing view.

Get the green light:

Meaning: To receive permission or approval to proceed.

Example: We finally got the green light to start the construction project.

Get down on:

Meaning: To criticize or express disapproval of someone.

Example: Don’t get down on yourself; mistakes happen to everyone.

Get a feel for:

Meaning: To become familiar with or gain an understanding of something.

Example: Spend some time in the new environment to get a feel for the culture.

That’s all! Hope you have learnt a lot from here. Like I say, use them as much as possible in your conversation.

Last thoughts:

Alrighty, so here’s the lowdown on phrasal verbs.

They’re like the secret sauce that adds flavor to your English.

Sure, they might seem a bit tricky at first, but once you get the hang of them, it’s a game-changer.

Think of phrasal verbs as your language sidekicks, giving your words that extra oomph.

So, don’t shy away from using them. Dive in, have a play, and soon you’ll be tossing them around effortlessly.

Just remember, it’s all about context and feeling the vibe.

Don’t stress over it—phrasal verbs are here to make your language game more exciting.

So go ahead, spice up your sentences, and own those phrasal verbs like a boss!

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